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T'AI CHI MAGAZINE - December 2008
 

EDITOR'S NOTEBOOK > December 2008
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December 2008 - Editor's Notebook

The concept of song can be one of the most challenging in Tai Chi. It has physical, mental and emotional values. Its really not realistic to tell people to relax and be song when their tension has been a part of the fabric of their being for many years.

And there is no point in making people feel inadequate because they cannot lose their tension.

Fortunately, Tai Chi is a wonderful remedy for tension because of the variety of its movements and the stretching involved in each one. As much as stretching can help, it is not enough, as pointed out in this issue's cover article by Chen Youze, a professional coach in China and son of Chen Qingzhou.

He says that in order to reach a working state of song, a person has to relax the mind so that it can properly give the signal to the body to be song. “You want to relax the mind and the heart to be ready to song. Song has an alive quality. It isn't passive.”

He compared the springiness of song to the springiness of peng energy, while cautioning that they not the same.

Song is important, he said, not only for its physical and emotional benefits but also because it is a way of neutralizing an opponent's force. This type of neutralization happens in a very natural, relaxed and spontaneous way.

Chen Youze also gives some interesting suggestions regarding Tai Chi principles and how each detail is essential to the overall coordination of the body and its energy. It is always interesting to get someone's take on the Tai Chi principles because each person usually adds some personal insights based on their own practice that contributes our understanding.

William Ting of has an insightful article about how to see and experience Tai Chi. It is important understand all the aspects of Tai Chi and how they differ. But he takes it a step further and helps to show what is real.

William Ting of Mount Laurel, NJ, has written a number of thoughtful articles for the magazine over the years and this is another interesting one.

Jiang Jian-ye of Albany, NY, a prolific producer of teaching DVDs, has written an article on the significance of Tai Chi's 108 movements and the evolution of the spiritual and cultural significance of numbers in Chinese society.

His article is based on his own insights and research in China interviewing experts and reading documents.

Zhou Lishang writes another installment of her interview with Li Lian, a student of the famous Wu Tunan. This time the subject is releasing force, fajin, in push hands.

C. M. Havens again writes about his teacher, Earnest Gow, and traditional short force chin na. He describes his intersection with his teacher about this and describes training methods to develop this skill.

Alex Yeo of Singapore writes about practicing Tai Chi as martial art and as spiritual way. He says both have the requirements and benefits but concludes:

“In a nutshell, just knowing the art itself is not good enough if we truly want to plumb the depths of what Tai Chi is. Knowing and practicing the way is essential and should not be ignored.”

The concept of song can be one of the most challenging in Tai Chi. It has physical, mental and emotional values. Its really not realistic to tell people to relax and be song when their tension has been a part of the fabric of their being for many years. And there is no point in making people feel inadequate because they cannot lose their tension.

Fortunately, Tai Chi is a wonderful remedy for tension because of the variety of its movements and the stretching involved in each one. As much as stretching can help, it is not enough, as pointed out in this issue's cover article by Chen Youze, a professional coach in China and son of Chen Qingzhou.

He says that in order to reach a working state of song, a person has to relax the mind so that it can properly give the signal to the body to be song. “you want to relax the mind and the heart to be ready to song. Song has an alive quality. It isn't passive.” He compared the springiness of song to the springiness of peng energy, while cautioning that they not the same.

Song is important, he said, not only for its physical and emotional benefits because it is also a way of neutralizing an opponent's force. This type of neutralization happens in a very natural, relaxed and spontaneous way.

Chen Youze also gives some interesting suggestions regarding Tai Chi principles and how each detail is essential to the overall coordination of the body and its energy. It is always interesting to get someone's take on the Tai Chi principles because each person usually adds some personal insights based on their own practice that contributes our understanding.

William Ting of has an insightful article about how to see and experience Tai Chi. It is important understand all the aspects of Tai Chi and how they differ. But he takes it a step further and helps to show what is real.

William Ting of Mount Laurel, NJ, has written a number of thoughtful articles for the magazine over the years and this is another interesting one.

Jiang Jian-ye of Albany, NY, a prolific producer of teaching DVDs, has written an article on the significance of Tai Chi's 108 movements and the evolution of the spiritual and cultural significance of numbers in Chinese society. His article is based on his own insights and research in China interviewing experts and reading documents.

Zhou Lishang writes another installment of her interview with Li Lian, a student of the famous Wu Tunan. This time the subject is releasing force, fajin, in push hands.

C. M. Havens again writes about his teacher, Earnest Gow, and traditional short force chin na. He describes his intersection with his teach about this and describes training methods to develop this skill.

Alex Yeo of Singapore writes about practicing Tai Chi as martial art and as spiritual way. He says both have the requirements and benefits but concludes:

“In a nutshell, just knowing the art itself is not good enough if we truly want to plumb the depths of what Tai Chi is. Knowing and practicing the way is essential and should not be ignored.”

 
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